Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Portable homeless shelters

Ah, human ingenuity! It's apparently too ambitious to work on ending the problem of homelessness, but inventing a stopgap shelter for the homeless is doable enough... Not a bad idea! If Gregor Robertson's promises to end homelessness in Vancouver don't bear fruit, maybe he can just order a few thousand and install them in back alleys, doorways and parks... They're so much more attractive than cardboard boxes and dirty blankets.

5 comments:

Samantha said...

I had this idea today and decided to Google it and came up with this article. My idea incorporates using recycled plastic melted down and formed into walls for a portable shelter on wheels. It would measure approximately six feet long by three feet wide by four feet high; just big enough for a person to duck inside and get out of the cold and rain. It would have wheels on the bottom, so they could push it around wherever and I even thought they could be funded by selling advertising to place on the side, since homeless people just kind of amble around the city all day and night.

Samantha said...

I almost forgot...the plastic molded walls would be filled with Styrofoam (recycled) and it would have a door or hatch on the side with a very simple locking mechanism that can be locked while someone is on the inside. (No keys.) The only thing I'm having a problem with is a heat source...maybe a small wind turbine or solar panel on top? It seems heat may not be necessary, but it sure would be nice if I was a homeless person.

olesarchitect said...

8' x 20' steel shipping containers can be modified and configured to provide basic shelter for the homeless population. Finding the property to put them is another matter.

olesarchitect said...

8'x20' shipping containers can be modified to provide basic shelter for a single homeless person. Varying the modules or using 40' containers allow for small families. Finding the property, approvals and funding are another matter.

Anonymous said...

Hey what about does thousand (millions? of FEMA coffins that are being stored around the country?